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Effects of crosslinking degree of an acellular biological tissue on its tissue regeneration pattern

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
13032 828 2004 12 PDF Available
Title
Effects of crosslinking degree of an acellular biological tissue on its tissue regeneration pattern
Abstract

It was reported that acellular biological tissues can provide a natural microenvironment for host cell migration and may be used as a scaffold for tissue regeneration. To reduce antigenicity, biological tissues have to be fixed with a crosslinking agent before implantation. As a tissue-engineering scaffold, it is speculated that the crosslinking degree of an acellular tissue may affect its tissue regeneration pattern. In the study, a cell extraction process was employed to remove the cellular components from bovine pericardia. The acellular tissues then were fixed with genipin at various known concentrations to obtain varying degrees of crosslinking. It was shown in the in vitro degradation study that after fixing with genipin, the resistance against enzymatic degradation of the acellular tissue increased significantly with increasing its crosslinking degree. In the in vivo subcutaneous study, it was found that cells (inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and red blood cells) were able to infiltrate into acellular tissues. Generally, the depth of cell infiltration into the acellular tissue decreased with increasing its crosslinking degree. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was accompanied by degradation of the acellular tissue. Due to early degradation, no tissue regeneration was observed within fresh (without crosslinking) and the 30%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissues. This is because the scaffolds provided by these two samples were already completely degraded before the infiltrated cells began to secrete their own extracellular matrix. In contrast, tissue regeneration (fibroblasts, neo-collagen fibrils, and neo-capillaries) was observed for the 60%- and 95%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissues by the histological examination, immunohistological staining, transmission electron microscopy, and denaturation temperature measurement. The 95%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissue was more resistant against enzymatic degradation than its 60%-degree-crosslinking counterpart. Consequently, tissue regeneration was limited in the outer layer of the 95%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissue throughout the entire course of the study (1-year postoperatively), while tissue regeneration was observed within the entire sample for the 60%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissue. In conclusion, the crosslinking degree determines the degradation rate of the acellular tissue and its tissue regeneration pattern.

Keywords
Acellular tissue; Genipin; Crosslinking degree; Tissue regeneration
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Effects of crosslinking degree of an acellular biological tissue on its tissue regeneration pattern
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Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Biomaterials - Volume 25, Issue 17, August 2004, Pages 3541–3552
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering
Get Full-Text Now
Don't Miss Today's Special Offer
Price was $35.95
You save - $31
Price after discount Only $4.95
100% Money Back Guarantee
Full-text PDF Download
Online Support
Any Questions? feel free to contact us