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Bacterial interactions with contact lenses; effects of lens material, lens wear and microbial physiology

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
13783 903 2001 13 PDF Available
Title
Bacterial interactions with contact lenses; effects of lens material, lens wear and microbial physiology
Abstract

Contact lens wear is a successful form of vision correction. However, adverse responses can occur during wear. Many of these adverse responses are produced as a consequence of bacterial colonization of the lens. The present study demonstrated that during asymptomatic contact lens wear lenses are colonized by low levels of bacteria with gram-positive bacteria, such as coagulase negative staphylococci, predominating. Gram-negative bacteria are frequently the causative agents of adverse responses during contact lens wear. Measuring the adhesion of different strains and/or species of bacteria to different contact lens materials demonstrated considerable differences. In particular, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains Paer1 and 6294 and Aeromonas hydrophilia strain Ahyd003 adhered in larger numbers to the highly oxygen permeable contact lenses Balafilcon A compared to hydrogel lenses manufactured from either Etafilcon A or HEMA. Furthermore, after Balafilcon A lenses had been worn for 6 h during the day bacteria were able to adhere in greater numbers to the worn lenses compared to the unworn lenses with increases in adhesion ranging from 243% to 1393%. However, wearing Etafilcon A lenses usually resulted in a decrease in adhesion (22–48%). Bacteria were able to grow after adhesion to lenses soaked in artificial tear fluid and formed biofilms, visualized by scanning confocal microscopy. Chemostat grown bacterial cultures were utilized to enable control of bacterial growth conditions and bacteria were shown to adhere in the greatest numbers if grown under low temperature (25°C compared to 37°C). The changes in growth temperature was shown, using 2D gel electrophoresis, to change the experssion of cell-surface proteins and, using 1D gel electrophoresis, to change the expression of surface lipopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa Paer1. Thus, these surface changes would have been likely to have mediated the increased adhesion to Etafilcon A contact lenses.

Keywords
Bacterial adhesion; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Ocular microbiology; 2D gel electrophoresis; Scanning confocal microscopy
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Bacterial interactions with contact lenses; effects of lens material, lens wear and microbial physiology
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Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Biomaterials - Volume 22, Issue 24, 15 December 2001, Pages 3235–3247
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering
Get Full-Text Now
Don't Miss Today's Special Offer
Price was $35.95
You save - $31
Price after discount Only $4.95
100% Money Back Guarantee
Full-text PDF Download
Online Support
Any Questions? feel free to contact us