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Analysis of enzymopathies in the human red blood cells by constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
15515 1420 2006 12 PDF Available
Title
Analysis of enzymopathies in the human red blood cells by constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches
Abstract

The human red blood cell (RBC) metabolism is investigated by calculating steady state fluxes using constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches. For the normal RBC metabolism, flux balance analysis (FBA) is performed via optimization of various alternative objective functions, and the maximization of production of ATP and NADPH is found to be the primary objective of the RBC metabolism. FBA and two novel approaches, minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) and regulatory on–off minimization (ROOM), which can describe the behavior of the metabolic networks in case of enzymopathies, are applied to observe the relative changes in the flux distribution of the deficient network. The deficiencies in several enzymes in RBC metabolism are investigated and the flux distributions are compared with the non-deficient FBA distribution to elucidate the metabolic changes in response to enzymopathies. It is found that the metabolism is mostly affected by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) enzymopathies, whereas the effects of the deficiency in DPGM on the metabolism are negligible. These stoichiometric modeling results are found to be in accordance with the experimental findings in the literature related to metabolic behavior of the human red blood cells, showing that human RBC metabolism can be modeled stoichiometrically.

Keywords
Red blood cell; Enzymopathy; Flux balance analysis; Minimization of metabolic adjustment; Regulatory on–off minimization
First Page Preview
Analysis of enzymopathies in the human red blood cells by constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Computational Biology and Chemistry - Volume 30, Issue 5, October 2006, Pages 327–338
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering