fulltext.study @t Gmail

Using crude glycerol and thin stillage for the production of microbial lipids through the cultivation of Rhodotorula glutinis

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
20920 43197 2012 4 PDF Available
Title
Using crude glycerol and thin stillage for the production of microbial lipids through the cultivation of Rhodotorula glutinis
Abstract

Single cell oils (SCO) produced from oleaginous microorganisms are a potential alternative oil feedstock for biodiesel production. The worldwide production of glycerol, a 10% (w/w) byproduct produced in the transesterfication process of oils converted to biodiesel, is increasing as more biodiesel is being produced. For the purposes of cost reduction, crude glycerol was regarded as a suitable carbon source for the cultivation of Rhodotorula glutinis. In addition to using renewable crude glycerol, waste solution collected from the brewing company (called thin stillage) was adopted as a substitute to replace a costly nitrogen source used in the medium. The results of using mixture of crude glycerol and thin stillage indicated about a 27% increase in total biomass as compared to that of using crude glycerol with a standard medium. Using glycerol instead of glucose as the carbon source could also alter the lipid profile, resulting in an increase in linolenic acid (C18:2) to comprise over 20% of the total lipid. Successfully using renewable crude glycerol and thin stillage for the cultivation of oleaginous microorganisms could greatly enhance the economic competition of biodiesel produced from SCO.

Keywords
Crude glycerol; Lipid profile; Stillage; Biodiesel; Single cell oils (SCO)
First Page Preview
Using crude glycerol and thin stillage for the production of microbial lipids through the cultivation of Rhodotorula glutinis
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering - Volume 114, Issue 4, October 2012, Pages 453–456
Authors
, , ,
Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering