fulltext.study @t Gmail

Chloroplast thylakoid structure in evergreen leaves employing strong thermal energy dissipation

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
29663 44427 2015 10 PDF Available
Title
Chloroplast thylakoid structure in evergreen leaves employing strong thermal energy dissipation
Abstract

•Both thermal dissipation and thylakoid rearrangements in evergreens are extensive.•Thylakoid rearrangement features vary between tropical and temperate evergreens.•Vertical grana unstacking is independent of photoinhibition in evergreens.•In a tropical evergreen, only strong NPQ co-occurs with vertical grana unstacking.

In nature, photosynthetic organisms cope with highly variable light environments – intensities varying over orders of magnitudes as well as rapid fluctuations over seconds-to-minutes – by alternating between (a) highly effective absorption and photochemical conversion of light levels limiting to photosynthesis and (b) powerful photoprotective thermal dissipation of potentially damaging light levels exceeding those that can be utilized in photosynthesis. Adjustments of the photosynthetic apparatus to changes in light environment involve biophysical, biochemical, and structural adjustments. We used electron micrographs to assess overall thylakoid grana structure in evergreen species that exhibit much stronger maximal levels of thermal energy dissipation than the more commonly studied annual species. Our findings indicate an association between partial or complete unstacking of thylakoid grana structure and strong reversible thermal energy dissipation that, in contrast to what has been reported for annual species with much lower maximal levels of energy dissipation, is similar to what is seen under photoinhibitory conditions. For a tropical evergreen with tall grana stacks, a loosening, or vertical unstacking, of grana was seen in sun-grown plants exhibiting pronounced pH-dependent, rapidly reversible thermal energy dissipation as well as for sudden low-to-high-light transfer of shade-grown plants that responded with photoinhibition, characterized by strong dark-sustained, pH-independent thermal energy dissipation and photosystem II (PSII) inactivation. On the other hand, full-sun exposed subalpine confers with rather short grana stacks transitioned from autumn to winter via conversion of most thylakoids from granal to stromal lamellae concomitant with photoinhibitory photosynthetic inactivation and sustained thermal energy dissipation. We propose that these two types of changes (partial or complete unstacking of grana) in thylakoid arrangement are both associated with the strong non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence (a measure of photoprotective thermal energy dissipation) unique to evergreen species rather than with PSII inactivation per se.

First Page Preview
Chloroplast thylakoid structure in evergreen leaves employing strong thermal energy dissipation
Get Full-Text Now
Don't Miss Today's Special Offer
Price was $35.95
You save - $31
Price after discount Only $4.95
100% Money Back Guarantee
Full-text PDF Download
Online Support
Any Questions? feel free to contact us
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology - Volume 152, Part B, November 2015, Pages 357–366
Authors
, , , , ,
Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering
Get Full-Text Now
Don't Miss Today's Special Offer
Price was $35.95
You save - $31
Price after discount Only $4.95
100% Money Back Guarantee
Full-text PDF Download
Online Support
Any Questions? feel free to contact us