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Drug–DNA interactions and their study by UV–Visible, fluorescence spectroscopies and cyclic voltametry

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
30355 44472 2013 19 PDF Available
Title
Drug–DNA interactions and their study by UV–Visible, fluorescence spectroscopies and cyclic voltametry
Abstract

•DNA is the molecular target for many anticancer drugs.•Drug–DNA interaction.•Various types of Drug–DNA interaction.•Various techniques used for the study of Drug–DNA interaction.

The present paper review the drug–DNA interactions, their types and applications of experimental techniques used to study interactions between DNA and small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. DNA has been known to be the cellular target for many cytotoxic anticancer agents for several decades. Understanding how drug molecules interact with DNA has become an active research area at the interface between chemistry, molecular biology and medicine. In this review article, we attempt to bring together topics that cover the breadth of this large area of research. The interaction of drugs with DNA is a significant feature in pharmacology and plays a vital role in the determination of the mechanisms of drug action and designing of more efficient and specifically targeted drugs with lesser side effects. Several instrumental techniques are used to study such interactions. In the present review, we will discuss UV–Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The applications of spectroscopic techniques are reviewed and we have discussed the type of information (qualitative or quantitative) that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Not only have novel techniques been applied to study drug–DNA interactions but such interactions may also be the basis for the development of new assays. The interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases.

Graphical abstractDNA is present in body in the form of a double helix. Each strand is composed of a combination of four nucleotides. Within a strand these nucleotides are connected through phosphodiester linkages.Figure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload as PowerPoint slide

Keywords
Drug–DNA interaction; UV–Visible spectroscopy; Fluorescence spectroscopy; Cyclic voltammetry
First Page Preview
Drug–DNA interactions and their study by UV–Visible, fluorescence spectroscopies and cyclic voltametry
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology - Volume 124, 5 July 2013, Pages 1–19
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering