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Selectivity control of benzene conversion to phenol using dissolved salts in a membrane contactor

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
41775 45899 2011 8 PDF Available
Title
Selectivity control of benzene conversion to phenol using dissolved salts in a membrane contactor
Abstract

Effect of salts, pH, type of acids and anion sulphate in the synthesis and separation of phenol through the hydroxylation of benzene by using a Fenton reaction in a biphasic membrane contactor has been investigated. The results indicated that sodium sulphate (1 M) increased phenol extraction in the organic phase (76.3%) but also increased reaction kinetics promoting over-oxidation products and a black solid (tar) formation. The acids delayed and in some tests avoided the tar appearance as precipitate but also gave a reduction of phenol selectivity. The sulphate absence, obtained by using iron(0), did not avoid the precipitate formation but only caused its decrease favouring a significant increase of the ratio productivity/amount of black solid from 4.6 to 62.4.

Graphical abstractFigure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload high-quality image (100 K)Download as PowerPoint slideResearch highlights▶ Dissolved salts increased the amount of phenol extracted in the organic phase. ▶ Dissolved salts decreased selectivity, yield and productivity. ▶ The sulphate anion increased phenol degradation increasing tar formation. ▶ Fe(0) catalyst increased the ratio phenol productivity/amount of black solid.

Keywords
Liquid phase benzene oxidation to phenol; Catalytic membrane contactor; Selective oxidation; Tar formation from benzene; Salts and phenol extraction (from aqueous to organic)
First Page Preview
Selectivity control of benzene conversion to phenol using dissolved salts in a membrane contactor
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Applied Catalysis A: General - Volume 393, Issues 1–2, 15 February 2011, Pages 340–347
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Catalysis