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A comparative study of the selective catalytic reduction of NO by propylene over supported Pt and Rh catalysts

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
48240 46497 2008 11 PDF Available
Title
A comparative study of the selective catalytic reduction of NO by propylene over supported Pt and Rh catalysts
Abstract

The catalytic performance of Pt and Rh catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by propylene in the presence of excess oxygen has been investigated over catalysts supported on six different metal oxide carriers (CeO2, Al2O3, TiO2, YSZ, ZrO2 and W6+-doped TiO2). It has been found that the nature of the dispersed metal affects strongly the light-off temperature of propylene, the maximum NO conversion to reduction products and the selectivity towards nitrogen. For a given support, Pt catalysts are always more active for both NO reduction and propylene oxidation, but are much less selective towards N2, compared to Rh catalysts. Rhodium catalysts are able to selectively reduce NO even in the absence of oxygen in the feed. However, their activity is suppressed with increasing oxygen feed concentration possibly due to the formation of less reactive rhodium oxides. In contrast, oxygen promotes the de-NOx activity of platinum catalysts but decreases selectivity towards nitrogen. Results are explained by considering the effects of the nature of the metallic phase and the support on the elementary steps of the propylene-SCR reaction. It is concluded that the catalytic performance of both metals may be improved by proper selection of the support.

Keywords
Nitrogen monoxide; Propylene; Selective catalytic reduction; Platinum; Rhodium; Effect of support; Effect of oxygen concentration
First Page Preview
A comparative study of the selective catalytic reduction of NO by propylene over supported Pt and Rh catalysts
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental - Volume 80, Issues 3–4, 8 May 2008, Pages 260–270
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Catalysis