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Catalysis field in orthorhombic Mo3VOx oxide catalyst for the selective oxidation of ethane, propane and acrolein

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
54535 47013 2014 6 PDF Available
Title
Catalysis field in orthorhombic Mo3VOx oxide catalyst for the selective oxidation of ethane, propane and acrolein
Abstract

•Mo3VOx with different surface area and the same micropore volumes were synthesized.•Catalysis field for various selective oxidations was researched.•Catalysis field is different in a reflection of the molecular size of the reactants.

Orthorhombic Mo3VOx oxide catalysts in various crystal sizes with different external surface areas and the same micropore volumes were synthesized hydrothermally by adding sodium dodecyl sulphonate (SDS, C12H25SO3Na) to preparation solution and by changing synthesis temperature. The synthesized catalysts were then tested for the selective oxidations of ethane, propane, and acrolein, in order to clarity catalysis field for the reactions. It was found that ethane converted to ethene in the heptagonal channel in the structure of the catalyst and propane was also oxidized to COx in the heptagonal channel. Acrolein, on the other hand, was converted to acrylic acid at the mouth of the heptagonal channel. It is concluded that the heptagonal channel is all responsible for the catalysis for ethane, propane, and acrolein. However, the catalysis field is different in a reflection of the molecular size of the reactants.

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Keywords
Orthorhombic Mo3VOx oxide catalysts; Micropore; Selective oxidation; Catalysis field
First Page Preview
Catalysis field in orthorhombic Mo3VOx oxide catalyst for the selective oxidation of ethane, propane and acrolein
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Catalysis Today - Volume 238, December 2014, Pages 35–40
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Catalysis