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Microstructure formation on exposure of silicon carbide surfaces to the partial oxidation of methane

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
55645 47060 2011 13 PDF Available
Title
Microstructure formation on exposure of silicon carbide surfaces to the partial oxidation of methane
Abstract

Gas-phase silicon-based species, produced on exposure of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces to the partial oxidation of methane, can be transported away from the site of corrosion to form surface nano- and microstructures. These structures can be divided into two groups, silicon-based structures and silicon/carbon-based structures. Silicon oxide nanowires are the most prevalent of the silicon-based structures, and form on SiC surfaces downstream of the combustion zone. The silicon/carbon-based structures, formed towards the end of the combustion zone, are core–shell heterostructured fibres and take the form of either conical fibres or cross-linked fibre lattices. Low reactive gas concentrations, high temperatures and low methane/oxygen ratios enhance microstructure formation. The effect of gas-phase chemistry and fluid flow on surface behavior is discussed.

Graphical abstractFigure optionsDownload full-size imageDownload high-quality image (366 K)Download as PowerPoint slideHighlights► Silicon and carbon-based microstructures can form on silicon carbide surfaces exposed to the partial oxidation of methane. ► These structures include core–shell heterostructured fibres, cross-linked fibre lattices and silicon oxide nanowires. ► Low reactive gas concentrations, high temperatures and low methane/oxygen ratios exacerbate microstructure formation.

Keywords
Silicon carbide; Corrosion; Microstructures; Core–shell fibres; Silicon oxide; Graphite
First Page Preview
Microstructure formation on exposure of silicon carbide surfaces to the partial oxidation of methane
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Catalysis Today - Volume 178, Issue 1, 15 December 2011, Pages 85–97
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Catalysis