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Drug delivery with upconversion nanoparticles for multi-functional targeted cancer cell imaging and therapy

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
8240 582 2011 11 PDF Available
Title
Drug delivery with upconversion nanoparticles for multi-functional targeted cancer cell imaging and therapy
Abstract

Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with unique multi-photon excitation photoluminescence properties have recently been intensively explored as novel contrast agents for low-backgroundbiomedical imaging. In this work, we functionalize UCNPs with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted amphiphilic polymer. The PEGylated UCNPs are loaded with a commonly used chemotherapy molecule, doxorubicin (DOX), by simple physical adsorption via a supramolecular chemistry approach for intracellular drug delivery. The loading and releasing of DOX from UCNPs are controlled by varying pH, with an increased drug dissociation rate in acidic environment, favorable for controlled drug release. Upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging by a modified laser scanning confocal microscope reveals the time course of intracellular delivery of DOX by UCNPs. It is found that DOX is shuttled into cells by the UCNP nano carrier and released inside cells after endocytosis. By conjugating nanoparticles with folic acid, which targets folate receptors over expressed on various types of cancer cells, we further demonstrate targeted drug delivery and UCL cell imaging with UCNPs. Besides DOX, this non-covalent drug loading strategy can also be used for loading of photosensitizer molecules on UCNPs for potential near-infrared light induced photodynamic therapy. Our results suggest the promise of UCNPs as interesting nano carriers for multi-functional cancer therapy and imaging.

Keywords
Upconversion nanoparticles; Doxorubicin; Folate targeting; Drug delivery; Imaging
First Page Preview
Drug delivery with upconversion nanoparticles for multi-functional targeted cancer cell imaging and therapy
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Biomaterials - Volume 32, Issue 4, February 2011, Pages 1110–1120
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering