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Characterization of topographical effects on macrophage behavior in a foreign body response model

Paper ID Volume ID Publish Year Pages File Format Full-Text
9700 643 2010 13 PDF Available
Title
Characterization of topographical effects on macrophage behavior in a foreign body response model
Abstract

Current strategies to limit macrophage adhesion, fusion and fibrous capsule formation in the foreign body response have focused on modulating material surface properties. We hypothesize that topography close to biological scale, in the micron and nanometric range, provides a passive approach without bioactive agents to modulate macrophage behavior. In our study, topography-induced changes in macrophage behavior was examined using parallel gratings (250 nm–2 μm line width) imprinted on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS). RAW 264.7 cell adhesion and elongation occurred maximally on 500 nm gratings compared to planar controls over 48 h. TNF-α and VEGF secretion levels by RAW 264.7 cells showed greatest sensitivity to topographical effects, with reduced levels observed on larger grating sizes at 48 h. In vivo studies at 21 days showed reduced macrophage adhesion density and degree of high cell fusion on 2 μm gratings compared to planar controls. It was concluded that topography affects macrophage behavior in the foreign body response on all polymer surfaces examined. Topography-induced changes, independent of surface chemistry, did not reveal distinctive patterns but do affect cell morphology and cytokine secretion in vitro, and cell adhesion in vivo particularly on larger size topography compared to planar controls.

Keywords
Microtopography; Nanotopography; Foreign body response; Nanostructured biomaterials; Inflammation and wound healing; Cytokines
First Page Preview
Characterization of topographical effects on macrophage behavior in a foreign body response model
Publisher
Database: Elsevier - ScienceDirect
Journal: Biomaterials - Volume 31, Issue 13, May 2010, Pages 3479–3491
Authors
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Subjects
Physical Sciences and Engineering Chemical Engineering Bioengineering